Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 6 Level C/D

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Leveled Standard C

Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See Language standards 1 and 3.) (SL.4.6)

Leveled Standard D

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) (SL.8.6)

Teacher Notes
Informal discourse includes class discussions, paired, and small-group discussions.

Formal discourse includes presenting speeches (how to, persuasive, informational, expository) and debate (a formal contest of argumentation between two people or teams; an essential tool for reasoned discussion that generally aims to avoid descending to insult, emotional appeals, or personal bias).

Role plays, where students act out or perform the part of a person or character in a particular setting, can be used for training and to practice formal and informal discourse. Mock job interviews are one type of (formal) role play.

opens in a new window Talk moves can help guide student and teacher discussion. The mnemonic TAP introduces three considerations that help determine how one should speak, formal or informal: task (topic/subject; genre expectations), audience (peers, administrators, etc.), and purpose (to inform, persuade, or entertain). Adding an S for style helps students think about how they should change their speech and presentation to fit the task, audience, and purpose.

Brief but regular practice with prompts and speaking games can help students build their comfort level with public speaking.

Examples / Activities
Classroom Debate [r6cdeActivity]

Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
See Language standards 1 and 3 and related GED® RLA assessment targets.

L.1.4 Edit to eliminate non-standard or informal usage (e.g., correctly use try to win the game instead of trying and win the game).

Resources
opens in a new window Education World: More Resources for Classroom Debates
opens in a new window How Pop-up Debate Works from opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.
opens in a new window Listenwise
opens in a new window Speaking and Listening Rubric from Manchester High School Central

Speaking and Listening Standards: Rubric for Presentations [sl4abcdH1PresentationRubric]
opens in a new window Style-shifting: Examining and Using Formal and Informal Language Styles Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Talk Moves for Productive Discussion
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Persuasive Speech Outline and opens in a new window Template
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Public Speaking Activities

ELA Activities for Level C / D
Too Broke to Learn
Students will read a three-part blog series to gain a new perspective on student poverty and the stereotypes surrounding people who experience poverty through no choice of their own. Read More Too Broke to Learn
Using Multimedia Strategically
Students discuss good and bad presentations and read tips for avoiding multimedia mistakes. Then, they revise one of their own presentations by adding or changing a multimedia element. Read More Using Multimedia Strategically
Summarizing Pro/Con Videos
Have students work in groups to find a persuasive speech online, use a graphic organizer to analyze the speaker’s claims, and write a summary in five sentences or less. Read More Summarizing Pro/Con Videos
Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
Students analyze the figurative language in a short passage from Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Read More Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
Classroom Debate
Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate. Read More Classroom Debate
More Activities