Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 3 Level E

Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric

Leveled Standard E

Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. (SL11-12.3)

Teacher Notes
In identifying point of view, students should consider what they know about the speaker and the speech’s implicit or explicit purpose and audience. The rhetorical triangle depicts and different types of rhetorical appeal. opens in a new window Mnemonics may be helpful in teaching students to evaluate evidence. Students should also be aware of common logical fallacies.

This standard reinforces Reading anchors 1, 2, and 6 and Writing anchors 1 and 2.

Examples / Activities
Analyzing Rhetoric in a Video

Have students work in groups to analyze the rhetorical elements of a persuasive speech. As a group, discuss how the parts work together to influence an audience.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.6.1 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose of a text.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.6.4 Analyze how an author uses rhetorical techniques to advance his or her point of view or achieve a specific purpose (e.g., analogies, enumerations, repetition and parallelism, juxtapoisition of opposites, qualifying statements).
R.8.1 Delineate the specific steps of an argument the author puts forward, including how the argument’s claims build on one another.
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
R.8.3 Evaluate the relevance and sufficiency of evidence offered in support of a claim.
R.8.4 Distinguish claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
R.8.5 Assess whether the reasoning is valid; identify fallacious reasoning in an argument and evaluate its impact.
R.8.6 Identify an underlying premise or assumption in an argument and evaluate the logical support and evidence provided.

Resources
opens in a new window 10 Logical Fallacies You Should Know and How to Spot Them
opens in a new window American Rhetoric
opens in a new window Analyzing Famous Speeches as Arguments Lesson from ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Fallacies and opens in a new window Evidence from opens in a new window The Writing Center at UNC-Chapel Hill
opens in a new window The History Place: Great Speeches Collection
opens in a new window Illinois Online Network: Jigsaw Activity
opens in a new window Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Fallacies
opens in a new window Logical Fallacies,
opens in a new window Logic in Writing, and opens in a new window Stance and Language from the opens in a new window Purdue OWL
opens in a new window Mnemonics for Evaluating Sources

opens in a new window Objective Summary Checklist

opens in a new window Persuasive Techniques in Advertising Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window TEAL: Teach Summarization
opens in a new window Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies
opens in a new window 10 Logical Fallacies You Should Know and How to Spot Them
opens in a new window American Rhetoric
opens in a new window Analyzing Famous Speeches as Arguments Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Fallacies and opens in a new window Evidence from opens in a new window The Writing Center at UNC-Chapel Hill
opens in a new window The History Place: Great Speeches Collection
opens in a new window Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Fallacies
opens in a new window Logical Fallacies, opens in a new window Logic in Writing, and opens in a new window Stance and Language from the opens in a new window Purdue OWL

opens in a new window Objective Summary Checklist

opens in a new window Persuasive Techniques in Advertising Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Rhetorical Situations from the Norton Field Guide to Writing
opens in a new window The Rhetorical Triangle and Three Rhetorical Appeals by David Wright
opens in a new window The VCG: The Rhetorical Triangle
opens in a new window Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies
opens in a new window Using the Rhetorical Triangle & Rhetorical Appeals Video by David Wright

ELA Activities for Level E
Classroom Debate
Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate. Read More Classroom Debate
Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas
Students listen to and discuss informational audio presentations. Read More Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas
Before It’s Too Late
Students will read and summarize an 8-page chapter from a book on the subject of raising children to be responsible. Read More Before It’s Too Late
Job Search Vocabulary
Students research specific jobs and markets using opens in a new window Virginia Workforce Connection; they identify and define unknown words and use them in resumé building, cover letter writing, and mock interviewing. Read More Job Search Vocabulary
Analyzing Rhetoric in a Video
Have students work in groups to analyze the rhetorical elements of a persuasive speech. As a group, discuss how the parts work together to influence an audience. Read More Analyzing Rhetoric in a Video
More Activities