Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 3 Level C/D

Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

Leveled Standard C

Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence. (SL.5.3)

Leveled Standard D

Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. (SL.8.3)

Teacher Notes
Questioning can be conducted as a pair or group activity. One student is the “expert”–either because they have prior knowledge/experience of the topic or because they have studied background information before the task. A list of statements is given to the other student(s). These statements need to be formed into questions to ask the expert. Students should listen and write down answers.

Jigsaw activities also give students opportunities to be the expert, sharing details, and the information gatherer, forming questions.

Summarizing and paraphrasing are skills that require students to reprocess information and express it in their own words. These skills enhance student comprehension because they require active listening. A summary is an overview, in the student’s words, of the most important information from what they have heard because sometimes students get lost in the details. Instructors may want to explicitly teach step-by-step summarization strategies.

In identifying point of view, students should consider what they know about the speaker and the speech’s implicit or explicit purpose and audience. opens in a new window Mnemonics may be helpful in teaching students to evaluate evidence.

This standard reinforces Reading anchors 1, 2, and 6 and Writing anchors 1 and 2.

Examples / Activities
Summarizing Pro/Con Videos

Have students work in groups to find a persuasive speech online, use a graphic organizer to analyze the speaker’s claims, and write a summary in five sentences or less.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.7 Make evidence-based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.8.1 Delineate the specific steps of an argument the author puts forward, including how the argument’s claims build on one another.
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
R.8.3 Evaluate the relevance and sufficiency of evidence offered in support of a claim.
R.8.4 Distinguish claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
R.8.5 Assess whether the reasoning is valid; identify fallacious reasoning in an argument and evaluate its impact.
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.6.1 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose of a text.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.6.4 Analyze how an author uses rhetorical techniques to advance his or her point of view or achieve a specific purpose (e.g., analogies, enumerations, repetition and parallelism, juxtaposition of opposites, qualifying statements).
R.8.1 Delineate the specific steps of an argument the author puts forward, including how the argument’s claims build on one another.
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
R.8.3 Evaluate the relevance and sufficiency of evidence offered in support of a claim.
R.8.4 Distinguish claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
R.8.5 Assess whether the reasoning is valid; identify fallacious reasoning in an argument and evaluate its impact.

Resources
opens in a new window Illinois Online Network: Jigsaw Activity
opens in a new window 10 Logical Fallacies You Should Know and How to Spot Them

ELA Activities for Level C / D
America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
Students read opens in a new window “Filling America’s Need for Skilled Workers” Newsela article at an appropriate Lexile level and underline unknown words or new vocabulary, transitional words, and specific vocabulary words related to jobs and economics. Students then use opens in a new window Quizlet to create online vocabulary cards. Finally, students create individual resumés for Virginia job/job markets that they are interested in. Read More America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
Teen Driving Pro/Con Discussion
Following opens in a new window a lesson plan from the Teaching Channel, students read two articles on teen driving and the minimum driving age. After marking the readings and working collaboratively to make notes, learners use a jury-style philosophical chairs format to engage in productive student-led discussions. Read More Teen Driving Pro/Con Discussion
Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas
Students listen to and discuss informational audio presentations. Read More Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas
Summarizing Pro/Con Videos
Have students work in groups to find a persuasive speech online, use a graphic organizer to analyze the speaker’s claims, and write a summary in five sentences or less. Read More Summarizing Pro/Con Videos
Too Broke to Learn
Students will read a three-part blog series to gain a new perspective on student poverty and the stereotypes surrounding people who experience poverty through no choice of their own. Read More Too Broke to Learn
More Activities