Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 2 Level C/D

Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Leveled Standard C

Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (SL.4.2)

Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (SL.5.2)

Leveled Standard D

Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation. (SL.8.2)

Teacher Notes
Teachers should model summarization, analysis, and synthesis skills. Teachers may also need to make media and digital literacy skills explicit.

Teachers will want to discuss different types of motives for presenting information:
Social motives are the thoughts and ambitions that drive people to accomplish certain goals while avoiding other outcomes. These desires are based on cultural norms and accepted behaviors. Many social motives are shared by all humanity.

Commercial motives, or the profit motive, relates to financial gain. Deconstructing advertisements is a useful skill that highlights this motive.

Political motives refer to messages promoting or actions carried out in the interests of a particular government or political party.

Examples / Activities
The Soup Nazi and Customer Service

In Part 1, students listen to a radio interview with a dyslexic journalist and answer questions about the details. In Part 2, students listen and read along to a radio piece about successful dyslexics. Students answer questions found in the reading. In Part 3, students analyze a graph showing the divergence of IQ and reading ability in dyslexics

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.7 Make evidence based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in a text, or determine how data supports an author’s point.
R.8.3 Identify an underlying premise or assumption in an argument and evaluate the logical support and evidence provided.

Resources
opens in a new window 10 Lies that Advertising Sold You
opens in a new window CRIS Radio
opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.: 9 Big Ideas within the Speaking and Listening Standards
opens in a new window Deconstructing an Advertisement
opens in a new window Frank W. Baker Media Literacy Resources
opens in a new window How to Learn Faster with the Feynman Technique

ELA Activities for Level C / D
Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
Students analyze the figurative language in a short passage from Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Read More Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
The Soup Nazi and Customer Service
In Part 1, students listen to a radio interview with a dyslexic journalist and answer questions about the details. In Part 2, students listen and read along to a radio piece about successful dyslexics. Students answer questions found in the reading. In Part 3, students analyze a graph showing the divergence of IQ and reading ability in dyslexics Read More The Soup Nazi and Customer Service
Classroom Debate
Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate. Read More Classroom Debate
Too Broke to Learn
Students will read a three-part blog series to gain a new perspective on student poverty and the stereotypes surrounding people who experience poverty through no choice of their own. Read More Too Broke to Learn
America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
Students read opens in a new window “Filling America’s Need for Skilled Workers” Newsela article at an appropriate Lexile level and underline unknown words or new vocabulary, transitional words, and specific vocabulary words related to jobs and economics. Students then use opens in a new window Quizlet to create online vocabulary cards. Finally, students create individual resumés for Virginia job/job markets that they are interested in. Read More America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
More Activities