Reading Anchor Standard 9 Level C/D

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Leveled Standard C
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. (RI.5.9)

Leveled Standard D
Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. (RI.8.9)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.3.3 Analyze relationships within texts, including how events are important in relation to plot or conflict; how people, ideas, or events are connected, developed, or distinguished; how events contribute to theme or relate to key ideas; or how a setting or context shapes structure and meaning.
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.
R.6.2 Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others or how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s point of view.
R.7.3 Compare two passages that present related ideas or themes in different genre or formats (e.g., a feature article and an online FAQ or fact sheet) in order to evaluate differences in scope, purpose, emphasis, intended audience, or overall impact when comparing.
R.7.4 Compare two passages that present related ideas or themes in different genre or formats in order to synthesize details, draw conclusions, or apply information to new situations.
R.9.1/R.7.1 Draw specific comparisons between two texts that address similar themes or topics or between information presented in different formats (e.g., between information presented in text and information or data summarized in a table or timeline).
R.9.2 Compare two passages in similar or closely related genre that share ideas or themes, focusing on similarities and/or differences in perspective, tone, style, structure, purpose, or overall impact.
R.9.3 Compare two argumentative passages on the same topic that present opposing claims (either main or supporting claims) and analyze how each text emphasizes different evidence or advances a different interpretation of facts.

ELA Activities for Level C / D
Too Broke to Learn
Students will read a three-part blog series to gain a new perspective on student poverty and the stereotypes surrounding people who experience poverty through no choice of their own. Read More Too Broke to Learn
Teen Driving Pro/Con Discussion
Following opens in a new window a lesson plan from the Teaching Channel, students read two articles on teen driving and the minimum driving age. After marking the readings and working collaboratively to make notes, learners use a jury-style philosophical chairs format to engage in productive student-led discussions. Read More Teen Driving Pro/Con Discussion
America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
Students read opens in a new window “Filling America’s Need for Skilled Workers” Newsela article at an appropriate Lexile level and underline unknown words or new vocabulary, transitional words, and specific vocabulary words related to jobs and economics. Students then use opens in a new window Quizlet to create online vocabulary cards. Finally, students create individual resumés for Virginia job/job markets that they are interested in. Read More America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
Workplace Safety Presentations
Students read and listen to texts related to workplace safety. Then, students create their own multimedia presentations synthesizing the workplace safety lessons learned. Read More Workplace Safety Presentations
Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
Students analyze the figurative language in a short passage from Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Read More Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
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