Reading Anchor Standard 3 Level C/D

Anchor Standard R3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlines by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard C
Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (RI.4.3)

Leveled Standard D
Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). (RI.8.3)

  • Application: identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered). (RH.6-8.3)

Follow precisely a multi step procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks. (RST.6-8.3)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.3.1 Order sequences of events in texts.
R.3.3 Analyze relationships within texts, including how events are important in relation to plot or conflict; how people, ideas, or events are connected, developed, or distinguished; how events contribute to theme or relate to key ideas; or how a setting or context shapes structure and meaning.
R.3.4 Infer relationships between ideas in a text (e.g., an implicit cause and effect, parallel, or contrasting relationship).
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.6.4 Analyze how an author uses rhetorical techniques to advance his or her point of view or achieve a specific purpose (e.g., analogies, enumerations, repetition and parallelism, juxtaposition of opposites, qualifying statements).

ELA Activities for Level C / D
Too Broke to Learn
Students will read a three-part blog series to gain a new perspective on student poverty and the stereotypes surrounding people who experience poverty through no choice of their own. Read More Too Broke to Learn
Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas
Students listen to and discuss informational audio presentations. Read More Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas
Classroom Debate
Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate. Read More Classroom Debate
Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
Students analyze the figurative language in a short passage from Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Read More Figurative Language: Tractors Take Over
Using Multimedia Strategically
Students discuss good and bad presentations and read tips for avoiding multimedia mistakes. Then, they revise one of their own presentations by adding or changing a multimedia element. Read More Using Multimedia Strategically
More Activities