Language Anchor Standard 5 Level A/B

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Leveled Standard A
With guidance and support, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

  1. Sort words into categories (e.g., colors, clothing) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent.
  2. Define words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a tiger is a large cat with stripes).
  3. Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are cozy).
  4. Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare, glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing them or by acting out the meanings. (L.1.5)

Leveled Standard B
Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

  1. Distinguish the literal and non-literal meanings of words and phrases in context (e.g., take steps).
  2. Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe people who are friendly or helpful).
  3. Distinguish shades of meaning among related words that describe states of mind or degrees of certainty (e.g., knew, believed, suspected, heard, wondered). (L.3.5)

Teacher Notes

Students should be able to identify words by categories; teachers should model and explain why words go into certain categories (e.g., colors, cars, etc.).

Students should be able to define words by category and one or more key attributes.

Students should be able to identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe places that are wet, describe what you see in an office).

Students should be able to distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner and adjectives differing in intensity by defining/choosing them or by acting out the meanings (verb example: walk, sashay, mince, lumber; adjective example: loud, thunderous).

Students should be able to distinguish the literal and non-literal meanings of words and phrases in context (as, for example, in the phrases “jump to conclusions” or “raining cats and dogs”).

Examples / Activities
Categorizing Activity

Teacher models identifying key words in a nonfiction reading and sorting them into categories; students read another short passage and apply their categorization skills.

opens in a new window Workforce Readiness Skills:

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.4.1/L.4.1 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining connotative and figurative meanings from context.
R.4.2/L.4.2 Analyze how meaning or tone is affected when one word is replaced with another.
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.

Resources
opens in a new window How to Show Students that Word Choice Matters by Kara Wymans

ELA Activities for Level A / B
Conversational Fishbowl
Students choose a question (from a list such as opens in a new window this one ) to discuss in order to become more comfortable talking in a discussion format. Instructional focus should be on learners speaking one at a time and listening to respond or add to the topic. Read More Conversational Fishbowl
Understanding the Dyslexic Mind
In Part 1, students listen to a radio interview with a dyslexic journalist and answer questions about the details. In Part 2, students listen and read along to a radio piece about successful dyslexics. Students answer questions found in the reading. In Part 3, students analyze a graph showing the divergence of IQ and reading ability in dyslexics. Read More Understanding the Dyslexic Mind
Guest Speaker
Invite an informative guest speaker to class (or ask a student to speak to classmates about an area of expertise). Before the visit, have students plan the questions they will ask; during the visit, encourage students to ask follow-up questions. Read More Guest Speaker
“How To” Speeches
Teacher models a simple “how to” speech. Then, students prepare and deliver their own speeches. Read More “How To” Speeches
America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
Students read opens in a new window “Filling America’s Need for Skilled Workers” Newsela article at an appropriate Lexile level and underline unknown words or new vocabulary, transitional words, and specific vocabulary words related to jobs and economics. Students then use opens in a new window Quizlet to create online vocabulary cards. Finally, students create individual resumés for Virginia job/job markets that they are interested in. Read More America’s Skilled Workers: Vocabulary
More Activities