Reading Anchor Standard 10 Level C/D

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Leveled Standard C
Text levels:
Lexile: 740-1010
Flesch-Kincaid: 4.51-7.73
Reading Maturity: 5.42-7.92
ATOS: 4.97-7.03
Degrees of Reading Power: 52-60
SourceRater: 0.84-5.75

Leveled Standard D
Text levels:
Lexile: 925-1185
Flesch-Kincaid: 6.51-10.34
Reading Maturity: 7.04-9.57
ATOS: 7.00-9.98
Degrees of Reading Power: 57-67
SourceRater: 4.11-10.66

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.1 Comprehend explicit details and main ideas in text.
R.2.8 Draw conclusions or make generalizations that require synthesis of multiple main ideas in text.
R.3.1 Order sequences of events in texts.
R.3.2 Make inferences about plot/sequence of events, characters/people, settings, or ideas in texts.
R.3.3 Analyze relationships within texts, including how events are important in relation to plot or conflict; how people, ideas, or events are connected, developed, or distinguished; how events contribute to theme or relate to key ideas; or how a setting or context shapes structure and meaning.
R.3.4 Infer relationships between ideas in a text (e.g., an implicit cause and effect, parallel, or contrasting relationship).
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.
R.4.1/L.4.1 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining connotative and figurative meanings from context.

Reading Anchor Standard 9 Level C/D

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Leveled Standard C
Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. (RI.5.9)

Leveled Standard D
Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. (RI.8.9)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.3.3 Analyze relationships within texts, including how events are important in relation to plot or conflict; how people, ideas, or events are connected, developed, or distinguished; how events contribute to theme or relate to key ideas; or how a setting or context shapes structure and meaning.
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.
R.6.2 Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others or how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s point of view.
R.7.3 Compare two passages that present related ideas or themes in different genre or formats (e.g., a feature article and an online FAQ or fact sheet) in order to evaluate differences in scope, purpose, emphasis, intended audience, or overall impact when comparing.
R.7.4 Compare two passages that present related ideas or themes in different genre or formats in order to synthesize details, draw conclusions, or apply information to new situations.
R.9.1/R.7.1 Draw specific comparisons between two texts that address similar themes or topics or between information presented in different formats (e.g., between information presented in text and information or data summarized in a table or timeline).
R.9.2 Compare two passages in similar or closely related genre that share ideas or themes, focusing on similarities and/or differences in perspective, tone, style, structure, purpose, or overall impact.
R.9.3 Compare two argumentative passages on the same topic that present opposing claims (either main or supporting claims) and analyze how each text emphasizes different evidence or advances a different interpretation of facts.

Reading Anchor Standard 8 Level C/D

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Leveled Standard C
Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s). (RI.5.8)

Leveled Standard D
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (RI.8.8)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.5 Determine which detail(s) support(s) a main idea.
R.5.1 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of ideas.
R.6.2 Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others or how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s point of view.
R.8.1 Delineate the specific steps of an argument the author puts forward, including how the argument’s claims build on one another.
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
R.8.3 Evaluate the relevance and sufficiency of evidence offered in support of a claim.
R.8.4 Distinguish claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
R.8.6 Identify an underlying premise or assumption in an argument and evaluate the logical support and evidence provided.

Reading Anchor Standard 7 Level C/D

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Leveled Standard C

Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g. in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. (RI.4.7)

Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently. (RI.5.7)

Leveled Standard D

Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g. in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. (RI.6.7)

Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g. in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). (RST.6-8.7)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)

R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s point of view.
R.7.3 Compare two passages that present related ideas or themes in different genre or formats (e.g., a feature article and an online FAQ or fact sheet) in order to evaluate the differences in scope, purpose, emphasis, intended audience, or overall impact when comparing.

Writing Anchor Standard 9 Level C/D

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard C
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • Apply Reading standards from this level to literature (e.g., “Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text”).
  • Apply Reading standards from this level to literature (e.g., “Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text”).

Leveled Standard D
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • Apply Reading standards from this level to literature (e.g., “Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distince from personal opinions or judgments”).
  • Apply Reading standards from this level to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals’ ideas or events”). (W/WHST.6-8.9)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
See Reading standards 1-10 and related GED® RLA assessment targets.
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.
W.2 Produce an extended analytic response in which the writer introduces the idea(s) or claim(s) clearly; creates an organization that logically sequences information; develops the idea(s) or claim(s) thoroughly with well-chosen examples, facts, or details from the text; and maintains a coherent focus.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Writing Anchor Standard 8 Level C/D

Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

Leveled Standard A
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide list of sources. (W.5.8)

Leveled Standard B
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following standard format for citation. (W/WHST.6-8.8)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.1 Comprehend explicit details and main ideas in text.
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.7 Make evidence based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.
R.3.3 Analyze relationships within texts, including how events are important in relation to plot or conflict; how people, ideas, or events are connected, developed, or distinguished; how events contribute to theme or relate to key ideas; or how a setting or context shapes structure and meaning.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s argument.
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
R.8.3 Evaluate the relevance of sufficiency of evidence offered in support of a claim.
R.8.4 Distinguish claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
R.8.5 Assess whether the reasoning is valid; identify fallacious reasoning in an argument and evaluate its impact.
R.9.3 Compare two argumentative passages on the same topic that present opposing claims (either main or supporting claims) and analyze how each text emphasizes different evidence or advances a different interpretation of facts.
W.1 Determine the details of what is explicitly stated and make logical inferences or valid claims that square with textual evidence.
W.2 Produce an extended analytic response in which the writer introduces the idea(s) or claim(s) clearly; creates an organization that logically sequences information; develops the idea(s) or claim(s) thoroughly with well-chosen examples, facts, or details from the text; and maintains a coherent focus.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Writing Anchor Standard 7 Level C/D

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Leveled Standard C
Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

Leveled Standard D
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.1 Comprehend explicit details and main ideas in text.
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.7 Make evidence based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.
R.3.3 Analyze relationships within texts, including how events are important in relation to plot or conflict; how people, ideas, or events are connected, developed, or distinguished; how events contribute to theme or relate to key ideas; or how a setting or context shapes structure and meaning.
R.7.4 Compare two passages that present related ideas and themes in different genre or formats in order to synthesize details, draw conclusions, or apply information to new situations.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 6 Level C/D

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Leveled Standard C

Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See Language standards 1 and 3.) (SL.4.6)

Leveled Standard D

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) (SL.8.6)

Teacher Notes
Informal discourse includes class discussions, paired, and small-group discussions.

Formal discourse includes presenting speeches (how to, persuasive, informational, expository) and debate (a formal contest of argumentation between two people or teams; an essential tool for reasoned discussion that generally aims to avoid descending to insult, emotional appeals, or personal bias).

Role plays, where students act out or perform the part of a person or character in a particular setting, can be used for training and to practice formal and informal discourse. Mock job interviews are one type of (formal) role play.

opens in a new window Talk moves can help guide student and teacher discussion. The mnemonic TAP introduces three considerations that help determine how one should speak, formal or informal: task (topic/subject; genre expectations), audience (peers, administrators, etc.), and purpose (to inform, persuade, or entertain). Adding an S for style helps students think about how they should change their speech and presentation to fit the task, audience, and purpose.

Brief but regular practice with prompts and speaking games can help students build their comfort level with public speaking.

Examples / Activities
Classroom Debate [r6cdeActivity]

Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
See Language standards 1 and 3 and related GED® RLA assessment targets.

L.1.4 Edit to eliminate non-standard or informal usage (e.g., correctly use try to win the game instead of trying and win the game).

Resources
opens in a new window Education World: More Resources for Classroom Debates
opens in a new window How Pop-up Debate Works from opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.
opens in a new window Listenwise
opens in a new window Speaking and Listening Rubric from Manchester High School Central

Speaking and Listening Standards: Rubric for Presentations [sl4abcdH1PresentationRubric]
opens in a new window Style-shifting: Examining and Using Formal and Informal Language Styles Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Talk Moves for Productive Discussion
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Persuasive Speech Outline and opens in a new window Template
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Public Speaking Activities

Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 5 Level C/D

Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

Leveled Standard C

Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. (SL.5.5)

Leveled Standard D

Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.

Teacher Notes
Students will need an understanding of copyright and fair use in order to use multimedia effectively.

Rubrics and examples can help students understand basic design principles (including “less is more”) in order to use multimedia effectively. Learners should consider TAPS (task/topic, audience, purpose, and style).

Examples / Activities
Using Multimedia Strategically

Students discuss good and bad presentations and read tips for avoiding multimedia mistakes. Then, they revise one of their own presentations by adding or changing a multimedia element.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s argument.
R.8.4 Distinguish claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
W.2 Produce an extended analytic response in which the writer introduces the idea(s) or claim(s) clearly; creates an organization that logically sequences information; develops the idea(s) or claim(s) thoroughly with well-chosen examples, facts, or details from the text; and maintains a coherent focus.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Resources
opens in a new window Copyright and Fair Use, opens in a new window Beginning Graphic Design, and opens in a new window Excel 2016 – Charts Tutorials from opens in a new window GCFLearnFree
opens in a new window Critical Literacy in Action: Multimodal Texts on Global Warming Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Google Slides Tutorial by David Lee
opens in a new window GSuite Learning Center: Get Started with Slides
opens in a new window GuideStar: How to Design a Bad Presentation
opens in a new window Picture This: Combining Infographics and Argumentative Writing Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window PowerPoint 2016 and opens in a new window Prezi Tutorials from opens in a new window GCFLearnFree
opens in a new window Sharing Information About Careers with Infographics Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink


opens in a new window Rubric for Presentations

opens in a new window Students as Creators: Exploring Multimedia Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window A Student’s Guide to Getting Started with Piktochart
opens in a new window University of Leicester: Using Visual Aids
Visual Rhetoric at Purdue OWL