Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 6 Level E

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Leveled Standard E

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) (SL.11-12.6)

Teacher Notes
Informal discourse includes class discussions, paired, and small-group discussions.

Formal discourse includes presenting speeches (how to, persuasive, informational, expository) and debate (a formal contest of argumentation between two people or teams; an essential tool for reasoned discussion that generally aims to avoid descending to insult, emotional appeals, or personal bias).

Role plays, where students act out or perform the part of a person or character in a particular setting, can be used for training and to practice formal and informal discourse. Mock job interviews are one type of (formal) role play.

opens in a new window Talk moves can help guide student and teacher discussion. The mnemonic TAP introduces three considerations that help determine how one should speak, formal or informal: task (topic/subject; genre expectations), audience (peers, administrators, etc.), and purpose (to inform, persuade, or entertain). Adding an S for style helps students think about how they should change their speech and presentation to fit the task, audience, and purpose.

Brief but regular practice with prompts and speaking games can help students build their comfort level with public speaking.

Examples / Activities
Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas [r6cdeActivity2]

Listening and Responding Across Subject Areas [r6cdeActivity2]

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
See Language standards 1 and 3 and related GED® RLA assessment targets.

L.1.4 Edit to eliminate non-standard or informal usage (e.g., correctly use try to win the game instead of try and win the game).

Resources
opens in a new window Education World: More Resources for Classroom Debates
opens in a new window How Pop-up Debate Works from opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.
opens in a new window Listenwise
opens in a new window Speaking and Listening Rubric from Manchester High School Central

Speaking and Listening Standards: Rubric for Presentations [sl4abcdH1PresentationRubric]
opens in a new window Style-shifting: Examining and Using Formal and Informal Language Styles Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Talk Moves for Productive Discussion
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Persuasive Speech Outline and opens in a new window Template
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Public Speaking Activities

Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 6 Level C/D

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Leveled Standard C

Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See Language standards 1 and 3.) (SL.4.6)

Leveled Standard D

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) (SL.8.6)

Teacher Notes
Informal discourse includes class discussions, paired, and small-group discussions.

Formal discourse includes presenting speeches (how to, persuasive, informational, expository) and debate (a formal contest of argumentation between two people or teams; an essential tool for reasoned discussion that generally aims to avoid descending to insult, emotional appeals, or personal bias).

Role plays, where students act out or perform the part of a person or character in a particular setting, can be used for training and to practice formal and informal discourse. Mock job interviews are one type of (formal) role play.

opens in a new window Talk moves can help guide student and teacher discussion. The mnemonic TAP introduces three considerations that help determine how one should speak, formal or informal: task (topic/subject; genre expectations), audience (peers, administrators, etc.), and purpose (to inform, persuade, or entertain). Adding an S for style helps students think about how they should change their speech and presentation to fit the task, audience, and purpose.

Brief but regular practice with prompts and speaking games can help students build their comfort level with public speaking.

Examples / Activities
Classroom Debate [r6cdeActivity]

Students select a debate topic, organize pro/con teams, conduct research, plan arguments, and carry out a classroom debate.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
See Language standards 1 and 3 and related GED® RLA assessment targets.

L.1.4 Edit to eliminate non-standard or informal usage (e.g., correctly use try to win the game instead of trying and win the game).

Resources
opens in a new window Education World: More Resources for Classroom Debates
opens in a new window How Pop-up Debate Works from opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.
opens in a new window Listenwise
opens in a new window Speaking and Listening Rubric from Manchester High School Central

Speaking and Listening Standards: Rubric for Presentations [sl4abcdH1PresentationRubric]
opens in a new window Style-shifting: Examining and Using Formal and Informal Language Styles Lesson from opens in a new window ReadWriteThink
opens in a new window Talk Moves for Productive Discussion
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Persuasive Speech Outline and opens in a new window Template
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Public Speaking Activities

Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 6 Level A/B

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Leveled Standard A

Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly. (SL.K.6)

Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (See Language standards 1 and 3.) (SL.1.6)

Leveled Standard B

Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See Language standards 1 and 3.) (SL.3.6)

Teacher Notes
Teacher Notes
Informal discourse includes class discussions, paired, and small-group discussions.

Formal discourse includes presenting speeches (how to, persuasive, informational, expository) and debate.

Role plays, where students act out or perform the part of a person or character in a particular setting, can be used for training and to practice formal and informal discourse. Mock job interviews are one type of (formal) role play.

opens in a new window Talk moves can help guide student and teacher discussion. The mnemonic TAP introduces three considerations that help determine how one should speak, formal or informal: task (topic/subject; genre expectations),
audience (peers, administrators, etc.), and purpose (to inform, persuade, or entertain). Adding an S for style helps students think about how they should change their speech and presentation to fit the task, audience, and purpose.

Brief but regular practice with prompts and speaking games can help students build their comfort level with public speaking.

Examples / Activities
“How To” Speeches [r6abActivity]

Teacher models a simple “how to” speech. Then, students prepare and deliver their own speeches.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
See Language standards 1 and 3 and related GED® RLA assessment targets.

Resources
opens in a new window Speaking and Listening Rubric from Manchester High School Central

In Memory of Dr. King [r1abActivity]
opens in a new window Talk Moves for Productive Discussion
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com
opens in a new window Write-Out-Loud.com Public Speaking Activities

Writing Anchor Standard 6 Level E

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others

Leveled Standard E
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically. (W.9-10.6)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Writing Anchor Standard 6 Level C/D

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others

Leveled Standard C
With some guidance and support, use technology, including the Internet, to produce/publish writing and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in single sitting. (W.4.6)

Leveled Standard D
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. (W.7.6)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Writing Anchor Standard 6 Level A/B

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others

Leveled Standard A
With guidance/support, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing and collaboration with peers (W.1.6)

Leveled Standard B
With guidance/support, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. (W..6)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Reading Anchor Standard 6 Level E

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard E
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

  • Application: analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. (RL.9-10.6)

Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). (RL.11-12.6)
Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts. (RH.9-10.6)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.6.1 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose of a text.
R.6.2 Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others or how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.6.4 Analyze how an author uses rhetorical techniques to advances his or her point of view or achieve a specific purpose (e.g., analogies, enumerations, repetition and parallelism, juxtaposition of opposites, qualifying statements.)
R.9.1/R.7.1 Draw specific comparisons between two texts that address similar themes or topics or between information presented in different formats (e.g., between information presented in text and information or data summarized in a table or timeline).
R.9.2 Compare two passages in similar or closely related genre that share ideas or themes, focusing on similarities and/or differences in perspective, tone, style, structure, purpose, or overall impact.

Reading Anchor Standard 6 Level C/D

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard C
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. (RI.5.6)
Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described. (RL.5.6)

Leveled Standard D
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)
Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts). (RH.6-8.6)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.6.1 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose of a text.
R.6.2 Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others or how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.6.4 Analyze how an author uses rhetorical techniques to advances his or her point of view or achieve a specific purpose (e.g., analogies, enumerations, repetition and parallelism, juxtaposition of opposites, qualifying statements.)

Reading Anchor Standard 6 Level A/B

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard A
N/A

Leveled Standard B
Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. (RI.2.6)

Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text. (RI.3.6)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.6.1 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose of a text.
R.6.2 Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others or how an author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.