Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 2 Level E

Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Leveled Standard E

Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data. (SL.11-12.2)

Teacher Notes
Teachers should model summarization, analysis, and synthesis skills. Teachers may also need to make media and digital literacy skills explicit.

Teachers will want to discuss different types of motives for presenting information:
Social motives are the thoughts and ambitions that drive people to accomplish certain goals while avoiding other outcomes. These desires are based on cultural norms and accepted behaviors (which may vary across time and geography). Many social motives are shared by all humanity.

Commercial motives, or the profit motive, relates to financial gain. Deconstructing advertisements is a useful skill that highlights this motive.

Political motives refer to messages promoting or actions carried out in the interests of a particular government or political party.

Examples / Activities
Confessions of Nat Turner

Students will work in teams to integrate and evaluate information from slavery-era primary documents.

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.7 Make evidence based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in a text, or determine how data supports an author’s point.
R.7.4 Compare two passages that present related ideas or themes in different genre or formats in order to synthesize details, draw conclusions, or apply information to new situations.
R.8.2 Identify specific pieces of evidence an author uses in support of claims or conclusions.
R.8.3 Identify an underlying premise or assumption in an argument and evaluate the logical support and evidence provided.
R.8.5 Assess whether the reasoning is valid; identify fallacious reasoning in an argument and evaluate its impact.
R.9.1/R.7.1 Draw specific comparisons between two texts that address similar themes or topics or between information presented in different formats (e.g., between information presented in text and information or data summarized in a table or timeline).
R.9.3 Compare two argumentative passages on the same topic that present opposing claims (either main or supporting claims) and analyze how each text emphasizes different evidence or advances a different interpretation of facts.

Resources
opens in a new window CRIS Radio
opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.: 9 Big Ideas within the Speaking and Listening Standards
opens in a new window Frank W. Baker Media Literacy Resources
opens in a new window How to Learn Faster with the Feynman Technique

Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 2 Level C/D

Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Leveled Standard C

Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (SL.4.2)

Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (SL.5.2)

Leveled Standard D

Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation. (SL.8.2)

Teacher Notes
Teachers should model summarization, analysis, and synthesis skills. Teachers may also need to make media and digital literacy skills explicit.

Teachers will want to discuss different types of motives for presenting information:
Social motives are the thoughts and ambitions that drive people to accomplish certain goals while avoiding other outcomes. These desires are based on cultural norms and accepted behaviors. Many social motives are shared by all humanity.

Commercial motives, or the profit motive, relates to financial gain. Deconstructing advertisements is a useful skill that highlights this motive.

Political motives refer to messages promoting or actions carried out in the interests of a particular government or political party.

Examples / Activities
The Soup Nazi and Customer Service

In Part 1, students listen to a radio interview with a dyslexic journalist and answer questions about the details. In Part 2, students listen and read along to a radio piece about successful dyslexics. Students answer questions found in the reading. In Part 3, students analyze a graph showing the divergence of IQ and reading ability in dyslexics

Workforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.7 Make evidence based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.
R.6.3 Infer an author’s implicit as well as explicit purposes based on details in text.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in a text, or determine how data supports an author’s point.
R.8.3 Identify an underlying premise or assumption in an argument and evaluate the logical support and evidence provided.

Resources
opens in a new window 10 Lies that Advertising Sold You
opens in a new window CRIS Radio
opens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.: 9 Big Ideas within the Speaking and Listening Standards
opens in a new window Deconstructing an Advertisement
opens in a new window Frank W. Baker Media Literacy Resources
opens in a new window How to Learn Faster with the Feynman Technique

Speaking & Listening Anchor Standard 2 Level A/B

Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally

Leveled Standard A

Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood. (SL.K.2)

Leveled Standard B

Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read
aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (SL.3.2)

Teacher Notes
Teachers should model summarization, analysis, and synthesis skills. Teachers may also need to make media and digital literacy skills explicit.

Examples / Activities
Understanding The Dyslexic Mind

In Part 1, students listen to a radio interview with a dyslexic journalist and answer questions about the details. In Part 2, students listen and read along to a radio piece about successful dyslexics. Students answer questions found in the reading. In Part 3, students analyze a graph showing the divergence of IQ and reading ability in dyslexics.

opens in a new windowWorkforce Readiness Skills

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)R.2.1 Determine which detail(s) support(s) a main idea.R.2.7 Make evidence based generalizations or hypotheses based on details in text, including clarifications, extensions, or applications of main ideas to new situations.Resources
opens in a new windowCRIS Radioopens in a new window Dave Stuart Jr.: 9 Big Ideas within the Speaking and Listening Standards

Writing Anchor Standard 2 Level E

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Leveled Standard E
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content (this includes the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes).

  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g. headings), graphics (e.g. figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension
  2. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g. articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
L.1.4 Edit to eliminate non-standard or informal usage (e.g., correctly use try to win the game instead of try and win the game).
L.1.9 Edit to ensure effective use of transitional words, conjunctive adverbs, and other words and phrases that support logic and clarity.
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.5.1 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
R.5.3 Analyze how the structure of a paragraph, section, or passage shapes meaning, emphasizes key ideas, or supports an author’s purpose.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s argument.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Writing Anchor Standard 2 Level C/D

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Leveled Standard C
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  1. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g. headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  3. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g. another, for example, also, because).
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

Leveled Standard D
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content (this includes the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes).

  1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g. headings), graphics (e.g. charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
L.1.4 Edit to eliminate non-standard or informal usage (e.g., correctly use try to win the game instead of try and win the game).
L.1.9 Edit to ensure effective use of transitional words, conjunctive adverbs, and other words and phrases that support logic and clarity.
R.4.3/L.4.3 Analyze the impact of specific words, phrases, or figurative language in text, with a focus on an author’s intent to convey information or construct an argument.
R.5.1 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
R.5.3 Analyze how the structure of a paragraph, section, or passage shapes meaning, emphasizes key ideas, or supports an author’s purpose.
R.7.2 Analyze how data or quantitative and/or visual information extends, clarifies, or contradicts information in text, or determine how data supports an author’s argument.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Writing Anchor Standard 2 Level A/B

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Leveled Standard A
Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

Leveled Standard B
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  1. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
  3. Use linking words and phrases (e.g. also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section.

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
L.1.9 Edit to ensure effective use of transitional words, conjunctive adverbs, and other words and phrases that support logic and clarity.
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.

Reading Anchor Standard 2 Level E

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard E
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (RI/RL.9-10.2)
Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms. (RST.11- 12.2)

Teacher Notes

To meet this standard, students must be able to identify central ideas and themes, show how details convey the central ideas or themes, trace the development of central ideas or themes, and summarize the text.

For literature, students need an understanding of literary elements: plot, character, setting, theme, antagonistic forces, problems, resolution, conflict.

For informational texts, students need an understanding of central idea and supporting details.

Examples / Activities
Before It’s Too Late

Students will read and summarize an 8-page chapter from a book on the subject of raising children to be responsible.

opens in a new window Workforce Readiness Skills:

opens in a new window Confessions of Nat Turner:Students will work in teams to integrate and evaluate information from slavery-era primary documents.

opens in a new window Workforce Readiness Skills:

GED Social Studies Assessment Targets : USH.c.1: Slavery, CG.b.1: Natural rights philosophy

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.1 Comprehend explicit details and main ideas in text.
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.3 Make sentence level inferences about details that support main ideas.
R.2.4 Infer implied main ideas in paragraphs or whole texts.
R.2.5 Determine which detail(s) support a main idea.
R.2.6 Identify a theme, or identify which element(s) in a text support a theme.
R.2.8 Draw conclusions or make generalizations that require synthesis of multiple main ideas in text.
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.

Resources
opens in a new window GEDTS Guide to Close Reading: Hitting the Mark
opens in a new window Finding Themes in Literature Slideshare Presentation
opens in a new window Text Dependent Question Stems Aligned to CCRS

Reading Anchor Standard 2 Level C/D

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard C
Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. (RI.4.2)

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. (RL.4.2)

Leveled Standard D
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. (RI/RL.6.2)

  • Application: determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. (RST.6-8.2)

Teacher Notes

To meet this standard, students must be able to
identify central ideas and themes, show how details convey the central ideas or themes, trace the development of central ideas or themes, and summarize the text.

For literature, students need an understanding of literary elements: plot, character, setting, theme, antagonistic forces, problems, resolution, conflict.

For informational texts, students need an understanding of central idea and supporting details.

Theme is defined as a main idea or an underlying meaning of a literary work that may be stated directly or indirectly.

Examples / Activities
Too Broke to Learn

Students will read a three-part blog series to gain a new perspective on student poverty and the stereotypes surrounding people who experience poverty through no choice of their own.

opens in a new window Workforce Readiness Skills:

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.1 Comprehend explicit details and main ideas in text.
R.2.2 Summarize details and ideas in text.
R.2.3 Make sentence level inferences about details that support main ideas.
R.2.4 Infer implied main ideas in paragraphs or whole texts.
R.2.5 Determine which detail(s) support a main idea.
R.2.6 Identify a theme, or identify which element(s) in a text support a theme.
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.

Resources
opens in a new window 5 Ws Graphic Organizer (for writing summaries)
opens in a new window Determining Importance: Helping Students Recognize Important Points in Content Text from Ohio State University
opens in a new window GEDTS Guide to Close Reading: Hitting the Mark
opens in a new window Scholastic SCOPE: Central Idea or Supporting Detail? by Joanne Canizaro
opens in a new window Mount Township Public Schools (NJ) Reading Anchors with Writing and Teacher Prompts
opens in a new window Summarizing PPT Presentation
opens in a new window Summarizing Practice PPT Presentation
opens in a new window Text Dependent Question Stems Aligned to CCRS

opens in a new window Your Objective Summary Checklist

Reading Anchor Standard 2 Level A/B

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. (Apply this standard to texts of appropriate complexity as outlined by Standard 10.)

Leveled Standard A
Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. (RI.1.2)

Leveled Standard B
Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. (RI.3.2)

Teacher Notes

To meet this standard, students must be able to identify central ideas and themes, show how details convey the central ideas or themes, trace the development of central ideas or themes, and summarize the text.

For literature, students need an understanding of literary elements: plot, character, setting, theme, antagonistic forces, problems, resolution, conflict.

For informational texts, students need an understanding of central idea and supporting details.

Examples / Activities
Getting to Work on Time

Students at A level will be introduced to finding a main idea through pictures, and students with reading levels as low as first-grade equivalent will read a passage, retell it, and determine the main idea. Extension activities include practicing time management skills, including filling out a timesheet.

opens in a new window Workforce Readiness Skills:

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
R.2.1 Comprehend explicit details and main ideas in text.
R.2.3 Make sentence level inferences about details that support main ideas.
R.2.4 Infer implied main ideas in paragraphs or whole texts.
R.2.5 Determine which detail(s) support a main idea.
R.3.5 Analyze the roles that details play in complex literary or informational texts.

Resources
opens in a new window Determining Importance: Helping Students Recognize Important Points in Content Text from Ohio State University
opens in a new window IXL.com Interactive Practice: Y.2 Determine the Themes of Myths, Fables, and Folktales
opens in a new window Marshall Adult Education Reading Skills for Today’s Adults
opens in a new window Mount Township Public Schools (NJ) Reading Anchors with Writing and Teacher Prompts
opens in a new window Text Dependent Question Stems Aligned to CCRS

Language Anchor Standard 2 Level E

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Leveled Standard E
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  1. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
  2. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
  3. Spell correctly. (L.9-10.2)

GED® Assessment Targets (RLA)
L.1.1 Edit to correct errors involving frequently confused words and homonyms, including contractions (passed, past; two, too, to; there, their, they’re; knew, new; it’s its).
L.2.1 Edit to ensure correct use of capitalization (e.g., proper nouns, titles, and beginnings of sentences).
L.2.4 Edit to ensure correct use of punctuation (e.g., commas in a series or in appositives and other non-essential elements, end marks, and appropriate punctuation for clause separation).
W.3 Write clearly and demonstrate sufficient command of standard English conventions.